March 9, 1932 – China’s last emperor is Japanese puppet

March 9, 1932 – China’s last emperor is Japanese puppet

Henry Pu Yi, who reigned as the last emperor of China from 1908 to 1912, becomes regent of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo.

Enthroned as the emperor Hsüan-T’ung at the age of three, he was forced to abdicate four years later in Sun Yat-sen’s republican revolution. He took the name of Henry and continued to live in Beijing’s Forbidden City until 1924, when he was forced into exile. He settled in Japanese-occupied Tianjin, where he lived until his installment as the puppet leader of Manchuria in 1932.

In 1934, he became K’ang Te, emperor of Manchukuo, and he held the Title until he was captured by Soviet troops in the final days of World War II.

In 1950, Pu Yi returned to China and was imprisoned until Chinese leader Mao Zedong granted him amnesty in 1959. After his release, he worked in a mechanical repair shop in Peking.